A Deeper Look at Organ Damage in SCD

Learn more about how organ damage occurs in SCD and how vaso-occlusion and VOCs contribute. This unique whiteboard video explains the underlying complications that may not always be seen in SCD.

A Deeper Look at Organ Damage in SCD

Learn more about how organ damage occurs in SCD and how vaso-occlusion and VOCs contribute. This unique whiteboard video explains the underlying complications that may not always be seen in SCD.

Central nervous system complications in sickle cell disease

CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM (CNS)2-4

Acute Pain is the number one cause of hospital admissions2,3

Cerebrovascular Accident4

  • Transient ischemic attack occurs in ~4%
  • Overt stroke occurs in ~16%
  • Retinopathy occurs in ~23%
Musculoskeletal system complications in sickle cell disease

MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM5-9

Bone pain crisis : ~30% – Can lead to bone or bone marrow infarction and osteonecrosis

Avascular necrosis (AVN): 21%

  • Untreated AVN can cause permanent gait abnormalities and Iimb-length discrepancies

Nearly four times more surface tooth decay

Cardiopulmonary system complications in sickle cell disease

CARDIOPULMONARY SYSTEM10-12

Acute chest syndrome (ACS):

VOCs precede ACS in 80% of cases

Pulmonary hypertension: ~20%

Left-sided heart disease: ~13%

Lymphatic system complications in sickle cell disease

LYMPHATIC SYSTEM13-16

Splenic sequestration: up to 20%

  • May worsen anemia

Hepatic sequestration:

  • Can lead to acute hepatomegaly and severe anemia
  • ~10% of patients present with hepatic crisis during VOCs
Gastrointestinal and urogenital complications in sickle cell disease

GASTROINTESTINAL17

  • Cholelithiasis, acute cholecystitis, biliary sludge, and acute choledocholithiasis are common
  • Gallstones occur in ~75%

UROGENITAL12,18-20

  • Renal dysfunction begins at an early age, and ~30% experience chronic renal failure
  • Priapism occurs in ~35% of men

Survival of Patients With SCD by Number of VOCs per Year*

This analysis included 542 adult subjects diagnosed with SCD who were routinely monitored in clinics at the Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC; UNC Health Care System, Chapel Hill; and Grady Health System, Atlanta, GA.

  • VOCs were defined as crises requiring inpatient admission
  • Median survival was 61 years for patients with 0-4 VOCs per year and 53 years for patients with  >4 VOCs per year. Hazard ratio was 3.6982 (P<.0001)

 

 

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